Restaurants

Placeholder Image

Chef Michael Colletti began his culinary journey at a young age growing up watching his grandparents and father, who migrated from Sicily, preparing the family recipes with home grown ingredients such as figs, cardoons and persimmons. This early influence and curiosity led him into the family business — where it all started with dough — when he studied bagel making at his father’s side and then learned the ropes at his cousins’ pizzeria, Villa Borghese. The discovery of his natural palate and affinity for cooking led him to attend the Culinary Education Center in Asbury Park, NJ. Degree in hand, he soon worked alongside iconic New York chefs Sirio Maccioni of the world-renowned Le Cirque, as well as Drew Nieporent and Michael Bao at Mai House.

Restaurant
Placeholder Image

If you want to experience fine Italian dining, you need to go to Amarone Restaurant owned by Tony Amarone in the heart of the Theatre District in New York City. Amarone Restaurant has a warm, elegant and friendly atmosphere from the moment you walk into the restaurant you are greeted like family. Their staff are professional, attentive and courteous. They give that extra personal touch that enhances your dining experience. They also have a fantastic winery that flavors well with all of their Italian dishes. Amarone Restaurant is a place of unforgettable food. For More Information go to: www.lunapienanyc.com/amarone

Restaurant
Placeholder Image

If you enjoy sporting events especially a good basketball game you should see the New Jersey Nets at the Prudential Center. The tickets are very reasonable. They always have a live firework display at every game and dancers from different age groups performing dance tricks that will mesmerize you including their NJ Nets Dancers who always wear sex appeal outfits and dance to the latest music hitting the clubs. It’s a great family and friend outing to attend and you can even go as an ice-breaker with that someone you want to get to know

Restaurant
Placeholder Image

Situated among throngs of Indian restaurants on the East Village's Curry Row, Spice Cove stands out not for being the biggest or the most famous, but rather for being the coziest spot on the block to canoodle. The low-lit, orange-hued dining room welcomes guests to escape from the outside world beneath a low, black ceiling accented by rich, sparkling scarves. Servers dip between close-set tables in the homey space, delivering baskets of homemade naan and plates of chicken, lamb, or beef tikka masala. Vegetarians also have their choice of many meat-free dishes, such as spicy vegetable vindaloo and sweet kashmiri baby eggplant. Several prix fixe options offer economical bites, while the drink list includes wine, beer, lassis, and sodas for cooling off spiced tongues without curling up in the restaurant's freezer.

Restaurant
Placeholder Image

Tucked behind an unobtrusive downtown storefront, diners devour fish-fueled feasts at Mika Japanese Cuisine & Bar. Aquatic fare nestles in sashimi and specialty sushi, such as the shrimp-tempura-and-avocado-stuffed roll topped with black pepper tuna and onion salsa. Beef, chicken, and seafood broiled and marinated in gentle teriyaki sauce entice taste buds, as do steaming bowls of tempura and udon noodles. Larger parties can retire to the eatery's private karaoke room, which features a floor laid with tatami mats, and nibble on festive platters while singing into microphones or unguarded hand rolls.

Restaurant